“TalktoMeInKorean.com”: The Mecca of Online Korean Language Resources!

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TalkToMeinKorean.com (TTMIK) is one of the best online resources I have seen for students learning the Korean language.  They have resources for advanced learners, intermediate as well as beginners just getting started.  I don’t know even where to start on this site because it has so much!

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I just got done watching an advanced video about expressions: “약도”, “천리길도 한 겊음부터” and “초보운전”.  I was thoroughly impressed.  약도 is like a map, but one that you draw for someone trying to get somewhere.  천리 길도 한 걸음부터 is about how a thousand mile journey starts with a single step.  And I always wondered what the next one meant cause I saw it everywhere in Korea in the streets.  “초보운전” is written in the right side of streets and it is the lane for drivers who have just started driving.  Watch the video, I hope you like it!

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In another section called, Learn Korean with K Pop, K Pop songs are broken down phrase by phrase and an in depth explanation is given about the meaning and expressions.  It is brilliant!  
I hope this site helps you on your journey to fluency in the Korean Language!

Resources for students learning the Korean language

I am a student of the Korean language and what I noticed is that resources for learning the Korean language outside of Korea are scarce.  Even Rosetta Stone only covers the very basics of Korean.  Rosetta Stone is a good program, but too expensive for the small amount of information it provides.  When I was studying Korean living in Korea, I came across books that I found to be very helpful.  Some of these books can be found in small bookstores in Korea, but if you can’t find these books in a local book store, Seoul has a very large book store called, “Kyopo-Mun-Go (교보문고)” in central Seoul.  If you are going to get there by subway, take the purple line #5 to (광화문역) Gwanghwamun station and exit 3 or 4 should take you directly into the book store.  It is completely underground.  You can cut and paste “광화문역” into maps.Daum.net and it will show exactly where Gwanghwamun station is.  Go and find it!

“Korean Photo Dictionary” by Heart N Mind publishing 마음과 마음:
This book uses photos of elements from everyday Korean life and instead of giving you the definition in English, ties the Korean word to the photo through an illustration.

Korean Photo Dictionary

“Korean Grammar in Use: Beginning to Early Intermediate” by Ahn Jean-myung, Lee Kyung-ah, Han Hoo-young (Darakwon Publishing) – 21,000 :
This is a really good book I have gone back to again and again to reinforce fundamental grammar.  There is an intermediate to advanced sequel to this book.

Korean Grammar in Use: Beginner to Early Intermediate

“Korean Grammar in Use: Intermediate” by Min Jin-young and Ahn Jean-myung (Darakwon Publishing) – 23,000 :
This is the follow up to the previous book “Korean Grammar in Use: Early Beginner to Intermediate”. 

Korean Grammar in Use: Intermediate

“그림으로 보는 한영사전” (Korean-English Picture Dictionary) by 예림당 Yearimdang Publishing Co. 15,000 This dictionary was designed for Korean children learning to speak English, but will be suitable for the Korean learner as well.  I found this book in a random book store in Incheon.

Korean-English Picture Dictionary


“500 Basic Korean Adjectives”, by Bryan Park.  HOLLYM International Corp. Publishing:
A great book for breaking down the conjugations of Korean adjectives. 

500 Basic Korean Adjectives

“500 Basic Korean Verbs”, by Bryan Park.  HOLLYM International Corp. Publishing:
A great book for breaking down the Korean verb into all its elaborate conjugations.

500 Basic Korean Verbs

기탄 급수한자 8급 빨리따기:
In Korea, Korean children learn to read and write Hanja.  Hanja is the Korean language written with Chinese characters.  Before the 15th century monarch, King Sejong , the Korean language was written entirely in Chinese characters and only the educated could read and write it.  When King Sejong developed Hangul, the Korean writing system, the illiterate masses could begin to read and write as well.  As it stands today Hanja is still used, but mostly in newspapers and formal broadcasts.   This book will help you get a deeper understanding of the meaning of the Korean words derived from the Chinese language.  Each chapter gives the characters to be learned with a test at the end of each chapter.  There are eight levels in the study of Hanja.  Level 8 is beginner and Level 1 is most advanced.  In Korea there is a standardized test for proficiency in Hanja.  The name of the standardized exam is 전국한자능력검정시험.  It is something to aspire to.
The book uses a clever way to associate the Hanja with a picture.  Ddal means “month” and “moon”.  The Chinese character looks like a moon with light shinning from it.

Level 8 Hanja: Beginner

Level 7 Hanja: Late Beginner/ Early Intermediate

TOPIK: Test of Proficiency in Korean 한국어능력시험 :
https://i2.wp.com/www.topik.go.kr/img/hp/sub/link_logo.jpg
How well do you speak Korean?  Test yourself in the standardized test of proficiency in the Korean language: TOPIK.